Length:
3 days

Skill Level:
Advanced

Max Guide Ratio:
2:1

Recommended Season:
November to February; June to August

Prior Trip Suggestions:
Carihuairazo

Follow Up Programs:
Baños

Trip Highlights:
experienced climbers will be rewarded with a stunning view of the crater below with Chimborazo and Sangay in the background.

El Altar

El Altar is the fifth highest mountain in Ecuador and reaching the summit involves some technical climbing. It has been estimated that the historic peak of El Altar was higher than Chimborazo, but after a volcanic eruption all that remains of this ancient volcano is a 3 km long crescent ridge with nine summits surrounding an enormous crater lake.

The massive is referred to as Capac Urcu; Andean Quichua for the almighty or magnificent mountain. After the Spanish conquest, it was renamed El Altar likening it to a cathedral. There are religious names for each of the nine individual peaks. The highest peak is Obispo (5,320 m), at the Southern end of the crater.

El Altar is located in the Eastern Cordillera, 170 km south of Quito, in the Sangay National Park. To climb this beautiful mountain, it takes a degree of technical ability and it is not a recommended climb for beginners. It is some of the hardest climbing in Ecuador. And those experienced climbers will be rewarded with a stunning view of the crater below with Chimborazo and Sangay in the background.

photo gallery

trip itinerary

Day 1: We leave Riobamba at 8 am and drive an hour and a half to the small village of Boca Toma (3,500 m/ 11,482 ft). Here we put the equipment on the mules and start the 6 to 7 hour hike through the highlands to the Italian Camp (4,550 m/14,927 ft).

Day 2: At 3:00 am we begin our climb to the Obispo summit (5,320 m/17,454 ft). It takes approximately 12 hours for the complete round trip.

Day 3: At 9:00 am we begin the hike back to Boca Toma, then return to Riobamba.

Note:
Every effort will be made to adhere to the itinerary, but unforeseen circumstances may require last minute changes. Weather conditions, road conditions, vehicle breakdowns and the health of climbers can all contribute to schedule alterations. Please be prepared to be flexible when necessary.

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